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Lulu Garcia-Navarro Height, Weight, Net Worth, Age, Birthday, Wikipedia, Who, Nationality, Biography? Best 59 Answer

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Humdinger Garcia-Navarro is a well-respected columnist. She is known for hosting the weekend edition of National Public Radio on Sundays.

Garcia-Navarro, a graduate of Georgetown University, started out as an independent columnist for the BBC World Service and Voice of America, according to Wikipedia.Abcchamber.org

She also joined Associated Press Television in 1999 as a creator. During her stay with the news organization, she moved to Kosovo, Colombia, Afghanistan, Israel and Iraq.

Humdinger Garcia-Navarro has deced to go different ways after 17 years with National Public Radio (NPR).

Born

London, England, United Kingdom

alma mater

Georgetown University.

City University of London.

profession

journalist

active years

1999 – today

spouse

Jacob Her

On September 9, 2021, Garcia-Navarro announced her resignation from the organization on Twitter. She will be on the road as a large group of the Weekend Edition until October 17th.

She expressed that she is leaving NPR because she needs a break. No other plans have been announced at this time.

She also joined NPR in 2004 as the Mexico City agency director. During her stay she made a trip to Baghdad in 2008, to Jerusalem in 2009 and to Brazil in 2013.

She has received various awards for her commitment, including the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalist Award for her work in Mexico and the 2005 Peabody Award.

Noting her exit, a single NPR, Ari Shapiro, tweeted that she will be fondly remembered as a partner.

Humdinger Garcia-Navarro, aged 40 to 50, was born in London, England.

She later moved to the United States and grew up in Miami. She has an American entity. She became a US citizen in 2017.

Humdinger has Cuban and Panamanian entities from her parents’ se.

She received her four-year college education in international relations from Georgetown University and her journalism degree from City University.

Humdinger Garcia-Navarro’s confirmed compensation has not been revealed at this time.

She’s a veteran writer and National Public Radio host, so she should be able to come up with about a few thousand dollars.

Humdinger Garcia-Navarro’s better half James Her is a columnist for the Times of London.

The couple are happy about a little girl. They also sometimes travel to work together.

Who is Lulu Garcia-Navarro’s husband?

Where is Lulu Garcia after NPR?

In the wake of a trio of departures, news stories and private messages shared among NPR staffers reflected the concern that Black and Latina stars are leaving the network in droves. In November, Weekend Edition Sunday host Lulu Garcia-Navarro left to host a podcast for The New York Times opinion section.

Who is new host of Weekend Edition Sunday?

NPR has named Ayesha Rascoe host of Weekend Edition Sunday. She has been covering the White House for the network. NPR turned to a familiar and distinctive voice for its listeners – veteran White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe – to become the new host of Weekend Edition Sunday.

Why is Audie Cornish leaving?

Cornish revealed last week that she was moving on from NPR to “stretch [her] wings and try something new” and became the latest journalist of color to leave the organization. Her exit alarmed many online, including some of her colleagues, who called on NPR to do more to retain its talent.

How much are NPR hosts paid?

NPR Hosts earn $52,000 annually, or $25 per hour, which is 89% higher than the national average for all Hosts at $20,000 annually and 24% lower than the national salary average for ​all working Americans.

Why did Sam Sanders leave NPR?

Ultimately, he said he chose to leave for Vox because he enjoyed the shows he heard there.


Lulu Garcia-Navarro

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See some more details on the topic Lulu Garcia-Navarro Height, Weight, Net Worth, Age, Birthday, Wikipedia, Who, Nationality, Biography here:

Lulu Garcia-Navarro Height, Weight, Net Worth, Age, Birthday …

Garcia-Navarro, an alum of Georgetown University, begun as an independent columnist at BBC World Service and Voice of America, according to her Wikipedia.

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Date Published: 1/28/2022

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Lulu Garcia Navarro: Wiki, Bio, Age, Family, Career, Husband …

L.G. Navarro Bio, Height, Weight, Profile, Net Worth ; Date of Birth, May 26th (age NA) ; Age, Not Known ; Birth Place, London ; Zodiac sign/Sun sign, Gemini.

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Date Published: 9/8/2022

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Lulu Garcia-Navarro – Wikipedia

Lourdes “Lulu” Garcia-Navarro is an American journalist and an Opinion Audio podcast host for The New York Times. She was the host of National Public …

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Date Published: 8/12/2021

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Lulu Garcia Navarro Bio, Wiki, Age, Height, Education …

LuLu Garcia Navarro is an English -born American Journalist and also she is the current host of National Public Radio’s Weekend Edition Sunday.

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Date Published: 4/25/2021

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Lulu Garcia Navarro Wiki, Bio, Age, Family, Career, Husband, Net Worth

Lulu Garcia Navarro: Wiki, Bio, Age, Family, Education, Hobbies, Career, Achievements, Husband, Net worth : Lulu Garcia Navarro is an English-born American journalist and current host of National Public Radio’s Sunday edition. She was previously a foreign correspondent and served as director of NPR’s Jerusalem office from April 2009 to late 2012. Her coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and vivid cables on the Arab Spring uprisings earned Garcia-Navarro widespread recognition and five awards in 2012, including the Edward R. Murrow and Peabody Awards for her coverage of the Libyan uprising.

Lulu Garcia Navarro Education

Navarro went to the University of Georgetown, where she studied International Relations, where she later earned a Master’s degree in Journalism from City University, London. She began her career as a freelance journalist for The Voice of America and the BBC World Service, traveling to Cuba, Syria, Panama and various European countries on behalf of the two organizations.

Lulu Garcia Navarro family

Navarro was born and raised by her parents in London, United Kingdom. Our efforts to find out more about her family have been unsuccessful as such information is not publicly available. Thus, the identity of Navarro’s parents is still unclear. It is also not known if she has siblings.

Lulu Garcia Navarro husband

Garcia-Navarro is happily married to her lovely husband, Times of London journalist James Hider. The couple is blessed with a daughter. However, the couple has not announced the year they publicly married.

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Lulu Garcia Navarro career

Garcia-Navarro studied international relations at Georgetown University and later earned a master’s degree in journalism from City University London. She began her career as a freelance journalist for the BBC World Service and Voice of America, traveling to Cuba, Syria, Panama and several European countries on behalf of the two organizations. She was hired by the Associated Press Television News in 1999 as a producer and later worked for the news agency’s radio division. AP deployed Garcia-Navarro to Kosovo in 1999; Colombia in 2000; Afghanistan in 2001; Israel in 2002; and Iraq from 2002 to 2004. Garcia-Navarro traveled to Iraq on assignment before the 2003 war and was among the few journalists to cover the invasion as a one-sided reporter. Garcia-Navarro joined National Public Radio in November 2004 as head of the Mexico City bureau. She moved to Baghdad in January 2008, where she managed NPR’s Iraq coverage for more than a year. In spring 2009 she moved to Jerusalem. In April 2013, she opened NPR’s Brazil office. In February 2011, Garcia-Navarro was one of the first reporters to cover from eastern Libya as the insurgency gathered strength. It reported for months from rebel-held Benghazi, Tripoli and the western mountains as rebel forces fought fierce battles against Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s regime. Garcia-Navarro’s front-line reporting made her one of the most acclaimed journalists covering the Arab Spring.

Lulu Garcia Navarro success

Garcia-Navarro was awarded the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalist Prize for her work in Mexico. She was among teams that received the 2005 Peabody Award and the 2007 Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award recognizing NPR’s Iraq coverage. In addition to the Murrow and Peabody Awards, she received the City University in London XCity Award, Outstanding Correspondent Gracie Award and the Overseas Press Club Lowell Thomas Award in 2012.

Lulu Garcia Navarro Net Worth

Garcia-Navarro’s net worth is estimated to be between $1 million and $5 million. This includes their assets, their money and their income. Her main source of income is her career as a journalist. Through her various sources of income, Garcia Navarro has been able to amass a fortune but prefers to lead a modest lifestyle.

LG Navarro privacy

Lulu Gracia Navarro, commonly known as Lulu, has been pretty secretive about her private life. She prefers to keep her life to herself and rarely reveals any information about her private life. From various sources it became known that she celebrates her birthday on May 26th. Lulu is a married woman who opens up about her relationship status and love life. She had tied the knot with James Hider, who works as a journalist at the Times of London. The couple was blessed with a beautiful daughter. Although Lulu was born in the UK, she holds American citizenship.

Here is Lulu Gracia Navarro’s Full Bio/Wiki, Her Family Names/Mother/Father/Brother, Age, Height in Feet, Weight, Body Measurements, Interests/Hobbies, Boyfriends, Girlfriends, Husband, Cars, Property, Bikes, Address, Email, Home, Hometown, Ethnicity, Hometown, Birthplace, Parents, Achievements, Phone Number, School, Her Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Income/Income/Net worth, Birthday, Zodiac, Education, Caste, Religion, Date of Birth .

LG Navarro Bio, Height, Weight, Profile, Net worth

Real name Lulu Gracia Navarro Nickname Lulu Gender Female Profession Journalist Height (approx.) Unknown Weight (approx.) Unknown Body measurements (approx.) Unknown Eye color Unknown Hair color Unknown Date of birth 26 May (Age NA) Age not known Place of birth London Zodiac/Sun Sign Gemini Nationality British, American Hometown not known School not known College/University Georgetown University, City University London Educational level Master’s degree in Journalism Religion not known Ethnicity White Caste not known Address not known Hobbies/ Interests not known Marital Status Married affairs/boyfriends/girlfriends not known Sexuality not known Parents Father: Cuban Mother: Panamanian Siblings not known Husband James Hider Children 1 Net worth $1 million -$5 million.

Some Lesser-Known Facts About Lulu Garcia Navarro

She is the current anchor of National Public Radio’s weekend edition on Sundays.

On September 9, 2021, she announced that she would be leaving NPR effective October 17, 2021.

Garcia-Navarro traveled to Iraq on assignment before the 2003 war and was one of the few journalists to cover the invasion as a one-sided reporter.

She grew up in Miami.

Garcia-Navarro joined National Public Radio in November 2004 as head of the Mexico City bureau.

Her coverage of the Arab Spring earned her the 2011 Peabody Award and numerous other awards.

Social Media Accounts:

Instagram

Twitter

Also read: Natasha Chen (journalist)

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NPR hosts’ departures fuel questions over race. The full story is complex

NPR hosts’ departures fuel questions about the race. The whole story is complex

Enlarge image Toggle caption NPR NPR

After a trio of departures, messages and private messages shared among NPR staffers reflected concerns that black and Latino stars are leaving the network in droves.

In November, Weekend Edition Sunday anchor Lulu Garcia-Navarro left the company to host a podcast for the New York Times opinion section. In December, Noel King left Morning Edition and Up First for Vox. Last week, All Things Considered and Consider This Host Audie Cornish chose to host CNN’s new streaming service.

“The hosts … are the reason these shows have been so successful, along with all the people who work so hard on these shows every day,” NPR CEO John Lansing said in an interview. “Losing someone we consider super valuable is always a problem.”

Listeners and colleagues have posted complaints on social media. Ari Shapiro, host of All Things Considered, said on Twitter that NPR “bleeds hosts from marginalized backgrounds.” Much of the commentary reflects a belief that NPR has proven unable to do the right thing when race is a factor, willfully or recklessly shunning its future stars even as it strives to attract more black and Latino listeners.

NPR’s senior vice president for news, Nancy Barnes, wrote in a letter to employees Tuesday that the combined resignations have “created a hole in the heart of the organization.”

Additionally, NPR and WBUR informed member networks last week that Tonya Mosley would be leaving her job as the anchor of the network’s lunchtime show Here & Now later in the month. She will be special correspondent for the show until the end of her contract, which expires in August. Mosley, who is black, follows her own podcast called Truth Be Told, for which she bought the rights from public radio station KQED.

“I’ve had the privilege of being part of the greatest stories of our time at Here & Now for the past two years,” says Mosley. “As individual journalists and as institutions, we need to think about how we serve audiences that may be different than they are now. This is a moment when we need to think deeply about who we are and what value we have to people. Maintaining the status quo is not the way to go.”

Interviews with 12 people with direct knowledge of recent developments, including NPR moderators and executives, suggest NPR is indeed struggling to retain top-flight color journalists. The hosts have complained to the network’s leadership about racial and gender pay gaps. Some say the network is not delivering on its promises and is making contract negotiations unnecessarily contentious. And several hosts concluded they were made the public face of NPR but didn’t have the full support of the network.

But the interviews also paint a more complex picture.

Broadcast news programs no longer have a unified appeal

Major changes within the industry have shifted to where the ambitions of many journalists lie. Hosting a traditional radio program no longer has the same appeal it did a generation, or even a decade ago. For many today, it’s a combination of old-school prestige and everyday routine in an era of unrelentingly grim headlines. In late 2020, former Morning Edition host David Greene, who is white, left NPR without a recurrence. He was a mainstay of the network for 15 years.

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“I guess how people view these hosting jobs is in the eye of the beholder,” Lansing says. “The magazine shows are the definition of excellence and [the hosts] represent NPR on the radio and through the podcasts ‘Consider This’ and ‘Up First.’ They are the most visible expression of the NPR brand and what we stand for.”

Under Lansing, who is white, NPR has emphasized the need for diversity in its staffing, story choices, and audience, and has pursued initiatives to meet those needs. He has dubbed the mission the network’s “North Star” since arriving in the fall of 2019, months before people took to the streets to protest racial inequality and upend American corporate life. He set it up in weekly meetings of all employees as both a moral imperative and fundamental to the continued survival of the network.

But the new roles Cornish, King and Garcia-Navarro have taken on elsewhere give them greater individual prominence and a form of journalism that allows them to better express their individual sensibilities. Barnes, NPR’s news director, alluded to this fact in her note to staff.

“There are tremendous opportunities now for journalists that didn’t exist a decade ago, and that’s generally a good thing,” she wrote. “This fierce competition doesn’t explain all of our losses, and we need to work harder to remove every obstacle – from processes to work environment issues – that could make someone leave.”

“We plan to embrace and elevate new voices and build a robust, diverse pipeline of journalists ready to fill any important role,” wrote Barnes, who is white.

Data shared by NPR’s senior management suggests the network has made strides in racial diversity. For the fiscal year ended September 30, NPR’s turnover rate for employees of color was lower than for its entire workforce. And 78% of all new hires were black, up from about half in the previous two years. (The network didn’t break these numbers down solely for editorial staff. NPR’s staff is overwhelmingly female, both on the editorial staff and more broadly.)

Lansing says NPR needs to do more to ensure its black journalists are treated with respect and have opportunities to explore their ambitions. He also says that attrition is part of the reality of media, especially when other organizations are aggressively moving into audio with podcasts and other digital on-demand offerings.

Increasingly, for-profit outlets such as The New York Times and The New Yorker are also producing programs for public radio stations that compete with NPR offerings. And NPR hosts often have outside interests. Mary Louise Kelly and Scott Simon write novels, while Steve Inskeep is the author of several historical non-fiction books; Shapiro has sung on tour with Pink Martini and Alan Cumming; in April he is scheduled to perform his solo cabaret performance at a prestigious New York City cabaret bar.

Within NPR, Shapiro, who is white, and King, who is black, hosted podcasts centered around their interests. Both felt handicapped by NPR’s programming department, which oversees podcasts and is operated separately from the news site, according to colleagues they spoke to.

Several people interviewed for this story expressed frustration that the two sides — news and programming — weren’t being run more consistently. While there have been countless collaborations, particularly in expanding the brands of these tentpole shows into daily podcasts, news executives cannot specifically promise NPR’s journalists that they can develop podcasts and other projects without approval from the program side.

While NPR’s news programs define the network for tens of millions of listeners, NPR now derives more sponsorship revenue from podcasts than from these newscasts. And the audience of the podcasts is significantly younger and more diverse.

NPR raises host salaries after pay gap confrontation

In May 2020, four women NPR presenters of color — Garcia-Navarro, King, All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang, and Weekend All Things Considered host Michel Martin — sent Lansing a letter asking for fairer pay compared to their male colleagues asked. Publicly available tax forms listing top-paid employees suggest that female hosts are paid less than their male counterparts. In the case of Morning Edition’s Steve Inskeep and Weekend Edition’s Scott Simon, both white, seniority and longevity increased their pay.

The group met several times with Carrie Storer, the director of human resources for Lansing and NPR. Inskeep, the network’s highest-paid host, separately urged executives to also address the inequalities, according to three people with knowledge.

For example, according to NPR’s 2019 tax filings, Simon’s annual base salary was $75,000 more than Martin’s. He is white; She is black. Both put on a two-hour program every weekend.

Lansing proved receptive. And executives unveiled a “grid” — a chart meant to standardize pay while recognizing years of service and performance. As a result of the hosts’ advocacy, most hostesses received five-figure pay rises in subsequent individual contracts. But the grid eventually angered the people it was meant to reassure. Several hosts have concluded that after the initial increases, the network has placed a rigid cap on how much they can earn, regardless of offers from competing news outlets or other factors.

At a meeting with Lansing last week, numerous hosts complained about the salary structure.

“I thought at the time that the grid was a good attempt to address some of the concerns of the multitudes of people of color,” says Lansing. “I realized last week when I listened to them that that’s not the case.”

Lansing says NPR would find another solution.

“For a very long time, the way things worked at NPR was kind of haphazard based on how much you knew and who you knew,” says Sam Sanders, host of NPR’s It’s Been A Minute With Sam Sanders. “Things like payment and host compensation were done under cover of darkness. You would get your deal based on your relationship with management.”

Sanders, who is black, says NPR’s leadership didn’t expect their hosts to act in unison.

Sanders Show is both a podcast and weekly radio show developed out of the programming side. He argues that NPR has done more to build a new generation of talented presenters from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups through podcasts than through its shows.

“If there’s going to be a real conversation about pay equity, it has to be about the whole company,” says Sanders. “NPR is more than its news department.”

Tense contract negotiations accelerated departures

When it came time for Garcia-Navarro and King to renegotiate their contracts with the network, talks turned unexpectedly acrimonious. According to numerous colleagues, everyone felt that the tone was harsh and dismissive.

Colleagues say Garcia-Navarro is angry at the network’s suggestions that she withdraw her expression of interests as a Cuban or on social justice issues. Last week, after Cornish announced her departure, Garcia-Navarro tweeted: “People leave jobs for other opportunities when they are unhappy with the opportunities they have and the way they have been treated. I’m sad that this is happening, but it’s not that unexpected.”

Lansing says the sharpness about the contract negotiations hurts him. “It goes against what I stand for,” says Lansing. He says in recent talks with NPR’s unions he instructed the company’s negotiators to ensure new contracts were mutually beneficial.

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“Our people are all we have in terms of quality and credibility,” says Lansing. From now on, Lansing said he will personally review all hosting contracts before they are finalized.

Network executives say they appreciate the sensitivity of their hosts. “We’re moving in a direction where we want people to feel more comfortable bringing their lived experiences into the hosts’ chairs,” says Sarah Gilbert, NPR’s vice president of news magazines, who is white. “Our journalists want to feel like they can have a more agile career. We want to find a way to give people within our organization that opportunity.”

Elsewhere, new challenges for a permanent fixture in public service broadcasting

Cornish, a former convention reporter, had openly resented some of the restrictions on daily radio broadcasting and took on other projects while at NPR. She helped shape the development of Consider This, a podcast that evolved from All Things Considered that allows a single topic to be explored more fully in 12 to 15 minutes. And she often shone at live events and less formal venues like NPR’s Pop Culture Happy Hour podcast. A few years ago, she hosted a show for BuzzFeed’s video ventures.

Cornish, who is Black, wrote on Twitter last week that after 20 years on public radio and 10 years as a presenter, she was ready to try something new. “I go of my own accord without malice or resentment,” wrote Cornish. “I’ve had a great run with a company full of people I respect and admire.”

But she added: “I also understand that 4 hosts leaving in a year – three of them POC women – is a red flag.”

In 2019, Joshua Johnson left 1A, a nationally syndicated public affairs show run by WAMU in Washington, D.C. produced and distributed by NPR, for MSNBC. In recent online comments, Johnson, who is black, focused on a more competitive landscape for NPR journalists, including people of color.

“NPR is better for an inclusive workforce,” tweeted Johnson, now host of the NBC News Now streaming service. “But it would be far worse if that workforce thought they had nowhere else to go but @NPR. Realizing our potential requires new avenues of growth and opportunity. There’s a big difference between feeling safe and feeling stuck.”

NPR executives point to the recent hiring and promotions of color journalists. NPR’s newest anchors — A Martínez and Leila Fadel on Morning Edition and Mosley and Scott Tong on Here & Now — come from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds. Morning Edition’s new Executive Producer, Erika Aguilar, is Latina. The network’s new culture editor, Nick Charles, is Black.

“We’re not only focused on those who choose to leave NPR, but also on those who choose to come,” said Isabel Lara, NPR’s chief communications officer, who is Latina, in a statement. “Ensuring that the public media reflects the people of the United States is not a responsibility or initiative, it is a necessity.”

Disclosure: This story was reported and written by NPR Media Correspondent David Folkenflik and edited by NPR Media and Technology Editor Emily Kopp and Editor-in-Chief Terence Samuel. Per NPR protocol for self-reporting, no company official or news executive reviewed this story before it was released publicly.

Lulu Garcia-Navarro

English-born American journalist

Lourdes “Lulu” Garcia-Navarro (Arabic: لورديس “لولو” غارسيا-نافارو) is an American journalist and Opinion Audio podcast host for the New York Times. She was the host of National Public Radio’s weekend edition of Sunday from 2017 to 2021 when she left NPR after 17 years with the station. Previously a foreign correspondent, she served as director of NPR’s Jerusalem office from April 2009 to late 2012. Her coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and her vivid cables on the Arab Spring uprisings earned Garcia-Navarro widespread recognition and five awards in 2012. including the Edward R. Murrow[2] and the Peabody Award for her coverage of the Libyan uprising.[3] She then moved to Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and covered South America. Her series about the Amazon rainforest was a Peabody finalist and won an Edward R. Murrow Award for Best News Series.

Early life and education[edit]

Garcia Navarro was born in London, England. She has stated that her parents are “Cuban and Panamanian” and that she was raised in Miami.[4] Garcia-Navarro studied international relations at Georgetown University and later earned a master’s degree in journalism from City University London.

Career [edit]

She began her career as a freelance journalist for the BBC World Service and Voice of America, traveling to Cuba, Syria, Panama and several European countries on behalf of the two organizations.

She was hired by the Associated Press Television News in 1999 as a producer and later worked for the news agency’s radio division. AP deployed Garcia-Navarro to Kosovo in 1999; Colombia in 2000; Afghanistan in 2001; Israel in 2002; and Iraq from 2002 to 2004.[5]

Garcia-Navarro traveled to Iraq on assignment before the 2003 war and was one of the few journalists to cover the invasion as a one-sided reporter.[6]

Garcia-Navarro joined National Public Radio in November 2004 as head of the Mexico City bureau. She moved to Baghdad in January 2008, where she managed NPR’s Iraq coverage for more than a year. In spring 2009 she moved to Jerusalem. In April 2013, she opened NPR’s Brazil office.

Garcia-Navarro was awarded the 2006 Daniel Schorr Journalist Prize for her work in Mexico. She was among teams that received the 2005 Peabody Award and the 2007 Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award recognizing NPR’s Iraq coverage.

In February 2011, Garcia-Navarro was one of the first reporters to cover how the insurgency was gaining strength from eastern Libya. It reported for months from rebel-held Benghazi, Tripoli and the western mountains as rebel forces fought fierce battles against Colonel Muammar Gaddafi’s regime. Garcia-Navarro’s front-line reporting made her one of the most acclaimed journalists covering the Arab Spring.

In addition to the Murrow and Peabody Awards, she received the 2012 City University in London XCity Award,[7] the Outstanding Correspondent Gracie Award[8] and the Overseas Press Club Lowell Thomas Award[9].

From her base in Brazil, Garcia-Navarro covered political protests, the Zika virus and the Olympics. On January 8, 2017, she became the new regular presenter of NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. She later complemented that role by co-hosting the Saturday edition of the network’s Up First podcast with Weekend Edition host Scott Simon.

On September 9, 2021, she announced that she would be leaving NPR effective October 17, 2021.[10] The New York Times Company announced on September 30, 2021 that Garcia-Navarro would join their Opinion Audio team to anchor a new podcast to “explore the personal side of opinion.”[11] The company further announced on May 19, 2022 that the podcast – First Person – will be released on June 9, 2022.[12]

Personal life[edit]

Garcia-Navarro is married to London journalist James Hider.[13] You have a daughter. Garcia-Navarro became a US citizen in 2017.[14]

Awards[edit]

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